SPARE AIR

 

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     If a diver fails to open the tank valve sufficiently there is a great potential for disaster! I have seen this happen, and on one occasion the Spare Air saved the diver's life!

     At 3000 psi, a tank valve that is opened about 1/4 of a turn will deliver sufficient air and the pressure gauge will read normally. Take that same scuba to 60 feet and it will still deliver air at a rate that will provide the needs of the diver. Let that same tank drop to a pressure of approximately 1500 psi, and a restriction will occur that may indicate an out of air emergency. Going deeper will compound the problem. The alternate air regulator will not help! The BC cannot be filled at a normal rate from the tank. The pressure gauge may read close to zero. (It would climb to the proper tank pressure if the diver didn't continue trying to breathe.)

     One of the customers of Deep-Six had this happen to him at 70 feet. Instead of going into a panic, the diver's Spare Air was used to bring him safely to the surface. At that point his buddy checked the valve and found it to be only partially open.

     Deep-Six cannot emphasize enough how important the Spare Air is for a diver! Although the out of air emergency is rare in diving, when it occurs a back-up unit such as this is essential. It is one of the few systems that allows the diver to assist another diver without being attached to them!!!!!

For your safety, Spare Airs are sold to certified divers ONLY:

Click here to see a Spare Air     At 3000 psi, a tank valve that is opened about 1/4 of a turn will deliver sufficient air and the pressure gauge will read normally. Take that same scuba to 60 feet and it will still deliver air at a rate that will provide the needs of the diver. Let that same tank drop to a pressure of approximately 1500 psi, and a restriction will occur that may indicate an out of air emergency. Going deeper will compound the problem. The alternate air regulator will not help! The BC cannot be filled at a normal rate from the tank. The pressure gauge may read close to zero. (It would climb to the proper tank pressure if the diver didn't continue trying to breathe.)

Click here to see the Spare Air worn by a diver

     The Spare Air is a totally independent scuba system. It has its own tank, regulator, mouthpiece, and mounting system. The Spare Air is ready to deliver air as soon as the diver inhales. It may be worn on the tank strap, BC strap or pocket, or wherever it is handy to retrieve. It may be handed off to another diver who might be out of air. There are a sufficient number of breaths to allow a safe emergency ascent from as far down as 130 feet!

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